lundi 29 octobre 2012

JOYCE MANSOUR - POUR CELLES QUI DÉSIRENT DANS L'OMBRE ET LE BROUILLARD


Pour M.L.

Nout
Sans répit
Aux rongeurs sacrifiée
Nout
Coiffée de sa vulve tel un rêve prolongé
Nue comme une fille dans la bouche du canon
Kodak
Elle ouvre ses mille yeux
Et fait la roue sur ma poitrine
Feu de salve
L'eau salée fait irruption
Secrets et violence de la cruche couleur d'avoine
Renversée
Nout mère du veau naissant chaque fois que l'aube agite
Son plumeau de flammes au-dessus de l'horizon
Son pubis est un puits rare perdu dans le désert
Basilique aux rosaces cannibales
Autel empoisonné par le sperme
Cage thoracique pour robustes Cléones
Elle hurle et se débat
Une crête aux roues dentées
Creuse des sillons sur mes joues
Foudre récurrente ferveur corrosive
Ventre à ventre
Jambes deçà
Jambes delà
Elle m'enlace et puis s'envole
Mais inversons l'étoile
Nout ton sexe est un coq
Qui sur mon crâne lentement se dégorge
O le silence de ce sang coulant sans cailloux
Ni feuilles affaiblies pour ralentir sa chute
Lourds sanglots grassement angoras
Murs de pleurs glanduleux
Sang indigo qui sur mon front oscille
Nout la nuit
Si l'éclair fendant l'eau est un pénis aveugle
Et le ciel croûte ingrate une clef faussement chiffrée
Qui parsèmera ton corps de bourgeons stupides
Qui osera s'endormir

Extrait de « Phallus et Momies » (1969)

mardi 23 octobre 2012

TateShots meets Cosey Fanni Tutti



TateShots meets Cosey Fanni Tutti to discuss art and music.

Cosey Fanni Tutti is the ideal artist to start our new series on art and music, having worked across the two mediums since 1969. In this film, interspersed with live footage from her bands Throbbing Gristle and Chris and Cosey, she talks about her distaste for decorative art and how her music is all about emotion. She also discusses her work from the 1970s, in which she modeled for glamour magazines as a way to explore the commodification of sex. It would have been hypocritical, she explains, to use images of other people when she could have done it herself.









mardi 16 octobre 2012

Leah Gordon



Leah Gordon is a British photographer whom in 1991 went on a trip for the 1994 Amnesty International Report on Haiti and since has been exhibiting the photographs.

Her first Exhibition in 1995 was entitled ‘Haiti: Photos, Paintings and Ironworks’ at the October Gallery - the second being ‘Sacred Voodoo Flags of Haiti’ - the images from this show were printed in NERO magazine following her first exhibition at Riflemaker gallery ‘Voo-doo’ in 2009 and it was the first time I had come across the work - I obsessed with the images and had shown them to many friends.
Now I have stumbled upon more images via Rifemaker gallery whom are due to exhibit her work again from 5 July - Saturday 10 September. The show will be called ‘The Invisibles’.

http://www.leahgordon.co.uk


Atis-Rezistans: the Sculptors of Grand Rue
by Leah Gordon

Grand Rue is the main avenue that runs through downtown Port au Prince, Haiti. At its southern end is a community that has a historical tradition of arts, crafts and religious practice. Contemporary Haitian artists Celeur, Eugène, Claude and Guyodo all grew up in this ghetto atmosphere of junkyard make-do and artistic endeavour. Their powerful sculptural collages of have transformed the detritus of a failing economy into bold, radical and warped sculptures. Their work references their shared African & Haitian cultural heritage, a dystopian sci-fi view of the future and the transformative act of assemblage. The monumental works they have created are liberally scattered around this slum area, transforming the clamorous area into an organic art installation. This multi-layered film is a portrait of a neighbourhood both materially poor but culturally rich, and a meditation of the links between sex, death and creativity as expressed through the Vodou spirit Gede, that influences all their work. (2008)





















samedi 6 octobre 2012

Rosaleen Norton (1917 – 1979)



...was an Australian artist and occultist, witch.


“A big furry night-spider of the orb-weaving type soon took to spinning nightly over the open tent door. I became very fond of this being, whom regardless of sex, I named Horatius, because she guarded me from invasion single handed.

Most of my family were terrified of her, so I could stay up until morning if I felt like it, secure from interruption so long as she loomed in her great circular web over my doorway.”

Rosaleen Norton posing for a sketch









Rosaleen Norton ~ The Legendary Witch of Kings Cross